Top News

Hants’ Faces Friday – Collin Levy

Collin Levy owns and operates a small hobby farm in Upper Vaughan. Doing so helps cut down on the costs associated with buying groceries.
Collin Levy owns and operates a small hobby farm in Upper Vaughan. Doing so helps cut down on the costs associated with buying groceries.

UPPER VAUGHAN, N.S. — Faces Friday is our online feature highlighting members of our community: their strengths, challenges and humanity.

Meet hobby farmer Collin Levy, of Upper Vaughan. The 38-year-old Chester Road resident works full time at Oulton's Meats, volunteers his time at the Southwest Hants fire substation, is a father to two young boys – Blake and Whitman – and believes you reap what you sow.

Meet hobby farmer Collin Levy, of Upper Vaughan. The 38-year-old Chester Road resident works full time at Oulton's Meats, volunteers his time at the Southwest Hants fire substation, is a father to two young boys – Blake and Whitman – and believes you reap what you sow.

Collin Levy visits with Nellie, his dairy cow. She produces about four litres of milk every day for Levy's family to enjoy.
Collin Levy visits with Midnight, a 25-year-old former work horse.

Levy says people who are concerned about their health and what they're putting into their bodies should consider raising their own animals or growing their own vegetables. The physical labour of farming is also a positive, keeping people active and heart healthy, he said.

“I wouldn't call myself a hippie or anything like that. I just say it's more or less getting back to the basics. I think in today's civilization, we really need to get back to the basics because nowadays it doesn't seem to be as important. Everybody wants to live the healthy lifestyle, they want to eat the good food, but when you're buying it from a grocery store, you don't know what it is or where it comes from. It's trucked across the country in a big, vacuum-packed bag for meat. When you raise it yourself, you know what you've done to it. You know if the animal is sick, you give it medication to make the animal better. You know what you have on your plate is 100 per cent your own.”

Collin Levy gives his baby steers, Al and Jud, a scratch.

“Not everything has to be dependent on a machine. It's a healthier way of living. You're getting more exercise by walking more, doing more physical fitness. In today's society, we're just spoiled.”

Once they are bigger, Al and Jud will help Collin Levy haul logs out from his woodlot so he can make firewood.

“Manual labour keeps your heart ticking and keeps you in good shape. I'm not saying I'm in great shape but I get up in the morning at 5:30. This wakes my day up – going and doing chores. I'm awake, I'm alert. The last thing I do at the end of the day is my chores and then I get to sit down and relax. I have a feeling that I know what I've done. I can see the fruits of my labour.”

Collin Levy hopes to impress upon his children how you don't need technology to be self-sufficient. Pictured visiting Midnight is his son, Blake, who is seven.

“I am a volunteer firefighter. I have been for the last year at Southwest Hants Fire down here and I absolutely love it. I think it's important. The reason why I joined is because this out here is an aging community... They had a hard time when the whole thing happened with Windsor for finding recruits and I told my mother 'I think I'm going to join' because my thing is I've got to lead by example. If I don't join, how can I expect my neighbour to join or anybody else to join?”

For about $50 a week – less than the cost of what many smokers spend on cigarettes – Collin Levy can buy enough hay to keep his small hobby farm operational – and in turn, the animals provide him with fresh milk and eventually meat.

“With the training I've received, I feel confident in trying to help out my community and trying to help out anybody in need. That's my main thing. I always like to help out people in need. I've always tried to be that one to give a helping hand. If this guy needs a hand getting in his hay, or this fellow needs a hand fixing something or putting something on their truck, I always like to be that person to help out. I grew up in this community. I grew up with everybody around here. I know everybody here. If I can be that comforting face with the volunteer fire department when someone is in distress, then I'd like to be that comforting face or that helping hand to know that at least I'm trying to do everything that I can to help out.”

Recent Stories