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Hants History: Oct. 2, 2017 edition

Windsor's Regina Dicks, Sabrina Chace and Jane Hood were eager to visit with a 70 pound, 13-foot Burmese python during the 1992 Hants County Exhibition. Pictured with them are owners Wray Parr and Brian Robison.
Windsor's Regina Dicks, Sabrina Chace and Jane Hood were eager to visit with a 70 pound, 13-foot Burmese python during the 1992 Hants County Exhibition. Pictured with them are owners Wray Parr and Brian Robison.

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

25 years ago (Sept. 23 and Sept. 30, 1992 editions)

• Downtown Windsor merchants were becoming fed up with the number of shoplifting incidents occurring in town.

According to a police report, four Wolfville women were nabbed “as they munched on salads stolen” from the IGA. They were tied to a host of shoplifting incidents from Windsor to the Valley.

A group of men were being sought after several Windsor stores reported cartons of cigarettes being stolen.

• Windsor's town crier and long-time broadcaster Lloyd Smith announced he was moving to British Columbia. In 1992, he had been with Annapolis Valley Radio for 30 years.

• Barry Griffith announced he would be taking over the Nogami Restaurant in Cambridge after the operator decided to get out of the business.

• The Hants Shore Health Clinic celebrated its seventh year in operation. The leadership of Alice Galley and buy in from residents helped to establish the Kempt Shore clinic, which served 14 communities located along the Hants shore.

• Country singer/songwriter Joe Diffy, still considered a newcomer to the music scene, wowed the crowd at the Hants Exhibition Arena for two shows. He travelled “2,000 miles out of his way” to perform in town. At the time of the concert, he was known for the songs If the Devil Danced in Empty Pockets and Ships That Don't Come In.

• The conclusion of a 10-week archaeology dig at Uniacke house unearthed “the eccentricities of the rich in the early days of Nova Scotia.”

Constructed between 1813 and 1815 by Attorney General Richard John Uniacke, the Nova Scotia Museum funded the archaeology dig in hopes of enhancing the estate as a tourist attraction.

The team discovered a greenhouse, where exotic plants and flowers were grown (and during the wintertime, required someone to keep the fire burning to heat it), plus a 'haha wall' for grazing sheep.

• The Windsor Agricultural Society announced it would operate the Windsor Country Fair for another year. A total of 77 people were employed by the fair in 1992 and approximately 107,000 people visited the site.

• Big Brothers Big Sisters held their annual camp out at Camp Mockingee and had a very special visitor: NHL star Cam Russell, of the Chicago Blackhawks.

Lawrence Boyd's team of Belgian horses won big at the Hants County Exhibition in 1992. The horses were said to weigh about 1,900 pounds each and stand 18 hands high.

50 years ago (Sept. 27 and Oct. 4, 1967)

• Approximately 150 firefighters from New Minas, Aylesford, Wolfville, Canning, Greenwich, Port Williams, Kentville and Windsor helped battle a blaze at the New Minas Co-Op Feed Mill.

The fire, which started at the feed elevators and gutted the rest of the mill, was estimated to have done $750,000 in damage.

• Youngster Reid Eisenhauer, of St. Croix, won a pony at the Hants County Exhibition. Proceeds raised from the contest were donated to the new Windsor hospital.

• The Hantsport Glooscap archery team placed first at the Nova Scotia annual Open Archery Team Competition. The team consisted of Roger Hill, Keith Schofield, Roland Newcombe and Bob Mack.

• Plans were underway to enter a Windsor team in the new Junior B Hockey League, which was set to include teams from Berwick, Kentville, Dartmouth, Halifax and the South Shore.

• Dorothea Skelhorn, of Windsor, was reported to be the “happiest woman in the world” after learning she won $1,000 from a Windsor Lions Club contest.

• Grade 12 student Jill Delaney, of Falmouth, learned her story, Lost Love, was going to be published in a Centennial Book featuring student writers from across Canada. In other news, she was also selected to Princess Falmouth and was set to compete in the Queen of the Sea Contest in Lunenburg.

• Six employees of Fundy Gypsum Company Limited received gold watches for 25 years of service. They were: Raymond Brown, Carl Burrows, George Church, Angus Martin, Herbert Phillips, and Fred Shay.

• MacCarthy Motors Limited were promoting the latest and greatest vehicles to arrive in town. The dealership had the 1968 Beaumont, Firebird, Acadian, and the Pontiac Parisienne Sport Coupe and Sedan.

• A box of handpicked fresh raspberries arrived at the Hants Journal office. The warm weather extended the growing season of the popular fruit. They were picked by Mary Pippy on the farm of Edgar Fielden Sept. 26, 1967.

• In the Hants History column dating back to 1942, it was reported that the “Meander River, on rampage, isolates summer home of Ira Crowe.”

In 1917, high tides damaged the dikes in Centre Burlington, and submerged Windsor's wharves under water.

The Kentville Arena was destroyed by fire and in another fire-related incident, J. H. Stephens, of Tennecape, lost his new sawmill.

Youngster Reid Eisenhauer, of St. Croix, won a pony at the 1967 Hants County Exhibition. Pictured presenting the pony were R.D. Lindsey and John Martin.

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