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Tree canopy celebrated in Windsor as a dozen new saplings take root

Proud to celebrate the hard work and dedication it has taken to replenish the town’s tree canopy over the years, several representatives gathered for a ceremony to mark the occasion. From the left, back row, are Pat Gould-Thorpe, Amy Parker, Peter Francis, Ashley Langille, Troy Burgess, Drew Redden, Mayor Anna Allen, Stan Kochanoff, and Bill Gregory. Front row from the left are Adrienne Wood, Jeff Redden, and Liz Galbraith.
Proud to celebrate the hard work and dedication it has taken to replenish the town’s tree canopy over the years, several representatives gathered for a ceremony to mark the occasion. From the left, back row, are Pat Gould-Thorpe, Amy Parker, Peter Francis, Ashley Langille, Troy Burgess, Drew Redden, Mayor Anna Allen, Stan Kochanoff, and Bill Gregory. Front row from the left are Adrienne Wood, Jeff Redden, and Liz Galbraith.

WINDSOR, N.S. – About a dozen new, mature trees have taken root near the former tourist bureau site in Windsor, thanks to the dedication of some passionate tree lovers and Tree Canada.

Windsor Mayor Anna Allen said she was happy to see the new trees planted in the area near the wastewater treatment lift station.

“It’ll help to disguise the building, it’s not particularly pretty, but this will help bring back the trees that used to be there before construction happened,” Allen said. “And these are pretty big trees, which is wonderful, as the smaller ones don’t always survive.”

Allen said the trees will help make that entrance to the town, off of Highway 101, more appealing to visitors.

“It was a huge moment for all of the partners involved and for Communities in Bloom, which have played a big part, planting over 200 trees in our community, and they’re not done yet,” she said. “If anybody wants to come plant trees in my town, please come see me, because it’s pretty exciting to see that.”

Allen noted that many of the town’s trees were devastated approximately 25 years ago when the Dutch Elm Disease wreaked havoc on the tree population, but local groups have worked hard to rebuild the canopy since then.

A ceremony to commemorate the planting of red and white spruce trees, balsam firs, birch trees, sugar maples, and red oak trees took place at the old tourist bureau on October 6.

The trees were planted as part of a Tree Canada initiative, completing similar plantings across the country for Canada’s 150th birthday.

Tree Canada held an open application process where communities across the country could apply for similar projects.

Paul Jorgenson, manager of communications with Tree Canada, said Windsor’s application was met positively.

“To mark the Canada 150 in a way that we thought was positive and long-lasting, we decided to do 150 community-greening projects, with at least one in every single province and territory,” Jorgenson said. “This is the best way we know how to make more liveable communities for generations to come.”

Over 80,000,000 trees have been planted by the organization since 1992.

Elected officials, sponsors, representatives and community members came out to celebrate the planting of several trees earlier in the year towards the effort to improve Windsor’s tree canopy.

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