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One weekend left to catch The Mousetrap from Quick As A Wink

The eclectic cast listens on as Detective Sergeant Trotter (Andrew Kasprzak, centre) warns them that they're all in danger at King's-Edgehill School's Fountain Performing Arts Centre.
The eclectic cast listens on as Detective Sergeant Trotter (Andrew Kasprzak, centre) warns them that they're all in danger at King's-Edgehill School's Fountain Performing Arts Centre. - Colin Chisholm

The Mousetrap thrills Windsor audiences with mystery and intrigue

WINDSOR, N.S. – We can’t say how it ends, but crowds seemed pretty happy with Quick As A Wink Theatre Society’s production of Agatha Christie’s classic play The Mousetrap.

There’s still a chance to catch the murder mystery, and find out who did it, with show times on March 23 and 24 at 7 p.m., with a special 2 p.m. matinee on March 24 at King's-Edgehill School's Fountain Performing Arts Centre.

The play is set in England, 1952 and newlyweds Giles Ralston (Ryan Harvey) and Mollie (Ashley Langille) have high hopes for their new business as they prepare to welcome their first guests at Monkswell Manor.

Unfortunately, things don’t go according to plan, and all of the guests find themselves in extreme danger with a murderer apparently on the loose.

The eclectic cast of characters, including Christopher Wren (Frieden Gilbert), Mrs. Boyle (Carole Ball), Miss Paravicini (Lizon Richard), Miss Casewell (Lilly Ashdown), Major Metcalf (Geoff Ball) have to come to grips with the situation as Detective Sergeant Trotter (Andrew Kasprzak) investigates the scene.

The play is directed by David Myles and Pam Moore, The Mousetrap features local talent from several familiar and new to QAAW performers.

For co-director Pam Moore, The Mousetrap was her first experience sharing the director's chair, but she said it's been an overwhelmingly positive experience.

"I feel that the casting was perfect, and everyone, both cast and crew, has risen to the challenges presented by creating a convincing, well-paced adaptation of a classic show," Moore said. "Our production has stayed true to the period setting, and the brilliant way Christie lays out her trail of clues leaves audiences guessing until the very end."

"It's a classic whodunit, and we guarantee that people will be left guessing at intermission,  and shocked by the final revelation," she added.

Tickets are available here

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