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Twinning of Highway 101 near Windsor to begin shortly

The causeway along Highway 101 in Windsor is slated to be upgraded when the twinning project begins, allowing more fish access.
The causeway along Highway 101 in Windsor is slated to be upgraded when the twinning project begins, allowing more fish access. - Mark Goudge

Government announces expanded fish access in updated causeway plan

WINDSOR, N.S. — The provincial government has committed to spend $285 million on bridges and roads in the next budget, which is $60 million more than last year.

Some of that funding has been earmarked for the twinning project of Highway 101 near Windsor.

Brian Taylor, media relations advisor with the provincial government, said the province is following through with its promise to twin key sections of the 100-series highways over the coming years, without the use of much-maligned tolls.

“On the 101, construction of bridges at Exits 5 and 5A along with the start of earthworks in that area will begin in spring 2018,” Taylor said. “However, pre-construction activities such as geotechnical drilling, clearing, et cetera will begin this winter.”

Taylor said that since the aboiteau is nearing its end of life, the province has opted to upgrade the existing causeway and aboiteau system with improved fish passage and resiliency to climate change and sea level rise as part of the Highway 101 twinning project.

The current aboiteau, or causeway as it’s better known, provides flood protection for agricultural lands and allows for intermittent fish passage.

The aboiteau is operated by the Department of Agriculture.

“The upgraded aboiteau and causeway will allow for continued flood protection of agricultural lands and community infrastructure, while also accommodating the twinning of a critical piece of the provincial highway network,” Taylor said.

More information on the project can be found via the Community Liaison Committee that has been established for this portion of the project at http://hwy101windsor.ca/

In a press release from the provincial government, major construction on new highways and bridges accounts for $50 million of the increase in capital spending, most of which is focused on twinning portions of Highways 101, 103, and 104.
Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines said in a press release that the added spending is expected to create more than 3,000 new jobs in the construction industry.
The Five Year Highway Improvement Plan is subject to approval in the 2018-2019 budget.

 

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