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Huge granite harvest table assembled in Grand Pré


GRAND PRE - There is a new outdoor dining table ready for a feast at the Landscape of Grand Pré View Park.

The long-anticipated installation of the 16-seat table took place April 18.

“It took three-and-a-half years and a lot of patience, (but)  the 2012 Canadian Chefs’ Congress harvest table was finally installed,” said local mapmaker Marcel Morin.

The original concept was created by his wife - Angela Morin of Sagehouse Design -  he said,  and then the design was transformed into granite by Heritage Memorials of Windsor.

Marcel Morin, who runs Lost Art Cartography, designed a very detailed grey scale map of Grand Pré and the UNESCO World Heritage Site to cover the centre of the table. That process took about 100 hours, he estimates.

And then the map was burned onto black granite using a special laser on April 1. It took seven hours – longer with set up time.

“This was quite stressful," Marcel Morin said. "If the power went out or the gear jammed the whole process would have to be started over, re-polishing the granite and re-burning the image.”

The Landscape of Grand Pré brand mark was also sandblasted into the grey granite on each end.

“For the past eight months I have been working with Doug Murley of Heritage Memorials as we tested the limitations of the laser, constantly tweaking and refining the map image," Marcel Morin said.

The installation took the best part of a working day.

“(The) crew at Heritage Memorials did a great job," Marcel Morin said, "everything went smoothly.”

The harvest table is 15 feet in length and four feet wide with benches on both sides, all made of granite. Funds contributed by Kings County toward the Canadian Chefs’ Congress in 2012 helped pay for the table.

Marcel Morin expressed his gratitude “for all of the people who helped make this happen over the years.”

Did you know?

Last summer Marcel Morin was recognized for putting some Nova Scotia heritage sites on the map.

Three of Lost Art Cartography's maps were chosen by the Environmental Systems Research Institute for its annual map book. The book recognizes important and innovative accomplishments of geographic information system (GIS) users around the world.

The maps selected were: McNabs Island, The Landscape of Grand Pré World Heritage Site and The Tides of Grand Pré.

 welliott@kingscountynews.ca

The long-anticipated installation of the 16-seat table took place April 18.

“It took three-and-a-half years and a lot of patience, (but)  the 2012 Canadian Chefs’ Congress harvest table was finally installed,” said local mapmaker Marcel Morin.

The original concept was created by his wife - Angela Morin of Sagehouse Design -  he said,  and then the design was transformed into granite by Heritage Memorials of Windsor.

Marcel Morin, who runs Lost Art Cartography, designed a very detailed grey scale map of Grand Pré and the UNESCO World Heritage Site to cover the centre of the table. That process took about 100 hours, he estimates.

And then the map was burned onto black granite using a special laser on April 1. It took seven hours – longer with set up time.

“This was quite stressful," Marcel Morin said. "If the power went out or the gear jammed the whole process would have to be started over, re-polishing the granite and re-burning the image.”

The Landscape of Grand Pré brand mark was also sandblasted into the grey granite on each end.

“For the past eight months I have been working with Doug Murley of Heritage Memorials as we tested the limitations of the laser, constantly tweaking and refining the map image," Marcel Morin said.

The installation took the best part of a working day.

“(The) crew at Heritage Memorials did a great job," Marcel Morin said, "everything went smoothly.”

The harvest table is 15 feet in length and four feet wide with benches on both sides, all made of granite. Funds contributed by Kings County toward the Canadian Chefs’ Congress in 2012 helped pay for the table.

Marcel Morin expressed his gratitude “for all of the people who helped make this happen over the years.”

Did you know?

Last summer Marcel Morin was recognized for putting some Nova Scotia heritage sites on the map.

Three of Lost Art Cartography's maps were chosen by the Environmental Systems Research Institute for its annual map book. The book recognizes important and innovative accomplishments of geographic information system (GIS) users around the world.

The maps selected were: McNabs Island, The Landscape of Grand Pré World Heritage Site and The Tides of Grand Pré.

 welliott@kingscountynews.ca

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