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HANTS HISTORY: Early August 2019

In 1994, the Tidal Bore Country Craft Shoppe opened for business at the Poplar Grove Community Hall. The hall was open most days. Shown are hall members and shop organizers, from left, Shirley Pineo, Jeannie Meehan, Joan Carter and Vickie Malcolm.
In 1994, the Tidal Bore Country Craft Shoppe opened for business at the Poplar Grove Community Hall. The hall was open most days. Shown are hall members and shop organizers, from left, Shirley Pineo, Jeannie Meehan, Joan Carter and Vickie Malcolm. - FILE
WINDSOR, N.S. —

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

25 years ago (July 20 and 27, 1994 editions)

Sharon Bartosek, of Newport Corner, helped steady her appaloosa, Bandit, as David Pattison, of Centre Rawdon, helped tighten the cinch during a 1994 demonstration by the Historical Equestrian Society of Nova Scotia. - File photos
Sharon Bartosek, of Newport Corner, helped steady her appaloosa, Bandit, as David Pattison, of Centre Rawdon, helped tighten the cinch during a 1994 demonstration by the Historical Equestrian Society of Nova Scotia. - File photos

• After 15 years at the helm of the Town of Windsor, and after 30 years of service, Earle Hood announced he would not be seeking another term. During his tenure, he had served on all committees of council.

• Two Windsor teens were heralded as heroes after saving their friend’s life. John Copas and Shawn Foley were driving with Lincoln Smith when the vehicle they were travelling in left the road and ended up in Armstrong Lake. Copas and Foley managed to free themselves and made several dives to free their friend. Smith required resuscitation and it was reported he was in good condition in the hospital.

• The fire that destroyed the last army barracks in Windsor was determined to be accidental in nature.

• Police were looking for the person, or persons, who broke into the Royal Canadian Legion in Windsor and stole the new money changing machine and an undisclosed amount of cash. The machine had been slated to be installed in the wall the next day.

• A 29-year-old Hants County man was seriously hurt after attempting to dive into Lake Pisiquid when the water levels were too low. Reports were he sustained neck injuries and may never walk again.

• A weekend car accident in Martock claimed the life of a Halifax man and sent his passenger to the hospital with multiple injuries.

• Suzanne Hood, the daughter of Earle and Helen Hood, of Windsor, was honoured by the Dartmouth Heritage Museum. She was listed among 24 women “whose contributions have had a great impact on society.”

Hood began serving as a city solicitor in 1977 and frequently was called upon to give lectures. It was noted she had earned respect for her “crisp opinion in a clear voice of authority.”

In 1994, this seven-foot, 160-pound sturgeon, which had been stranded in a tidal pool on the mudflats of the Avon River near Avondale, was in luck. It was carried back to the water by Dennie Macumber and Daniel Macumber. Also pictured is Dennie’s son Andrew.
In 1994, this seven-foot, 160-pound sturgeon, which had been stranded in a tidal pool on the mudflats of the Avon River near Avondale, was in luck. It was carried back to the water by Dennie Macumber and Daniel Macumber. Also pictured is Dennie’s son Andrew.

Allyson Finden helped an aspiring geologist locate granite on the Geographical Highway Map of Nova Scotia during a special visit in 1994. Finden was touring schools and communities explaining the types of mining done in the province and what minerals can be discovered. She explained gypsum was even being used as a filler in bread and toothpaste.
Allyson Finden helped an aspiring geologist locate granite on the Geographical Highway Map of Nova Scotia during a special visit in 1994. Finden was touring schools and communities explaining the types of mining done in the province and what minerals can be discovered. She explained gypsum was even being used as a filler in bread and toothpaste.

Re-enactment participants Andrew Bennett and Noel O’Brien led settlers up from the Avon River during the 1994 Wharf Days celebrations. The re-enactment focused on what it would have looked like in 1760 when the Planter families arrived.
Re-enactment participants Andrew Bennett and Noel O’Brien led settlers up from the Avon River during the 1994 Wharf Days celebrations. The re-enactment focused on what it would have looked like in 1760 when the Planter families arrived.

• Halifax’s mayor confirmed the Kaiser Meadow landfill was one of two preferred destinations to send Metro Halifax garbage, much to the chagrin of residents in Upper Vaughans.

• Shand House Musuem was open daily for visitors but was holding special events to encourage more tourists to stop by. One such event was a contest. The winner would get to have a bird’s eye view of the Sam Slick fireworks while standing in the tower of the house.

• More than 400 people attended the re-enactment of the landing of the New England Planters from the sloops Lydia and Sally in Newport in May 1760.

• The Tidal Bore Country Craft Shoppe opened for business at the Poplar Grove Community Hall.

• Several bands were set to headline a special concert at Mermaid Theatre in Windsor. The bands included Mad Hat, Distorted Truth and A Fish’s View.

• Fundraising was well underway for the Windsor Hockey Heritage Society. One of the group’s key fundraisers was a contest to win a trip for two to Tampa Bay, Florida, to see the Lightning. In addition to this news, the society welcomed its newest member, Anna Allen.


 

Mitchel Blanchard, of Ellershouse, and his pony, Zackery, attended the 1994 Beech Brook Horse Show.
Mitchel Blanchard, of Ellershouse, and his pony, Zackery, attended the 1994 Beech Brook Horse Show.

The Windsor Tourist Bureau reopened for business in 1994 with much fanfare. Pictured are, from left, Heather Pemberton, co-chair of the tourist bureau, with her children Suzanne and Scott Pemberton, Mayor Earle Hood, manager Elizabeth Smith, previous hostess Helen Sherman, West Hants Warden Gary Cochrane and Jana Church, co-chair, with her daughter Patricia Church.
The Windsor Tourist Bureau reopened for business in 1994 with much fanfare. Pictured are, from left, Heather Pemberton, co-chair of the tourist bureau, with her children Suzanne and Scott Pemberton, Mayor Earle Hood, manager Elizabeth Smith, previous hostess Helen Sherman, West Hants Warden Gary Cochrane and Jana Church, co-chair, with her daughter Patricia Church.

In 1969, Red Cross water safety courses were being taught at the Hantsport Memorial Community Centre’s swimming pool. Pictured are instructors Ann McBurnie and Janet Johnson, right, with Julie Pitts and Margie Klein.
In 1969, Red Cross water safety courses were being taught at the Hantsport Memorial Community Centre’s swimming pool. Pictured are instructors Ann McBurnie and Janet Johnson, right, with Julie Pitts and Margie Klein.

50 years ago (July 16 and 23, 1969 editions)

• Jeanie Harrison, an 18-year-old former Windsor resident, died alongside two teenage friends in a car accident in New Brunswick.

• Since Nova Scotia implemented a defensive driving course in 1968, more than 2,500 Nova Scotians had successfully completed it.

• Elizabeth DeVenney, of the Avon 4-H Project Club, was crowned the 1969 Hants County 4-H Queen.

The 1969 Hantsport Memorial Community Centre’s swimming pool staff consisted of, from left, Danny Creaser, assistant supervisor, instructors Janet Johnson, Ann McBurnie, and Susan Turner, pool supervisor Frank Barteaux and instructor Craig Cuvilier, kneeling.
The 1969 Hantsport Memorial Community Centre’s swimming pool staff consisted of, from left, Danny Creaser, assistant supervisor, instructors Janet Johnson, Ann McBurnie, and Susan Turner, pool supervisor Frank Barteaux and instructor Craig Cuvilier, kneeling.

The first project the group wanted to undertake was stocking a local pond with trout for pre-school and elementary school age children.• The Nova Scotia Wildlife Federation welcomed the Hants Wildlife Association branch. The Hants group was formed on July 10. William Stevens was named the president, with Alvin Cochrane as the vice-president, Dennis Lynds as secretary and Earl Ross as treasurer. Membership was $3 per year.

• It was reported that militiamen of B Coy, WNSR, in Windsor completed one of the most successful training years undertaken. Most of the recruits completed their general military training and the leading infantryman course, meaning they advanced from pay level A to level C — a difference of $2 per hour.

• An urban renewal study, conducted in 1966, concluded that the existing Payzant Memorial Hospital was in no condition to be expanded upon and that the “21-acre site adjacent to the Masonic Home is recommended since it meets practically all the criteria for a hospital.” Fundraising for the new hospital was well underway by 1969.

• Pupils from across the Maritimes came to Windsor to take part in the Eastern Stock Horse Association Western Riding School. More than 400 people attended a mounted church service in Windsor at the conclusion of the event, which showcased the skills of 24 pupils who “mounted on their horses displayed horsemanship and pattern riding” during the service.

• Wayne Thomas, of Elmsdale, was heading to Africa to teach teachers during the summer months.

• Jim Greeno, of Falmouth, travelled to Carleton University in Ottawa for a conference on Venturing — a new part of the Scout program for older boys. A total of 257 boys attended the conference from across Canada — 15 of which came from Nova Scotia.

• Several local riders were winners at the Annapolis Pony Club Hunter Show in Port Williams.

Reserve Champion Hunter went to Fire Fly’s Pride, owned by Deanne Lane, of Windsor; Champion Hunter Pony went to Gay Matilda, owned by Carolyn Ainsworth, of Falmouth; and Reserve Champion Hunter Pony went to Sir Bronc, owned by Miriam White, of Windsor.

Participants in the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews student exchange program visited Windsor in 1969, where Scott Sheffield — the inspector of schools — and his wife (who had no name listed) entertained the guests.
Participants in the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews student exchange program visited Windsor in 1969, where Scott Sheffield — the inspector of schools — and his wife (who had no name listed) entertained the guests.

• Eighteen-year-old Grant Veinot, a right winger for the Windsor Junior Royals, was highlighted in the Journal. He finished the 1968-69 hockey season as the leading scorer in the Metro Valley Junior Hockey League, having collected 60 points on 33 goals and 27 assists in 30 games. As such, he was awarded the Boyd Trophy.

• Hants County’s Garnet Smith, Brian Mitchell and Wayne Archibald were selected to represent Nova Scotia in track and field at the upcoming 1969 Canada Games.
• Dominion Store’s sunny savings included such items as one pound of butter for 68 cents, fully cooked, smoked pork shoulders for 69 cents a pound, and five packages of orange fruit crystals for $1.

• The Imperial Theatre in Windsor was a busy spot during July. Movie goers were treated to such movies as These Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines, The Sweet Ride, The Brotherhood, where Kirk Douglas “gives the kiss of death,” the comedic Carry on Doctor, The Name of the Game is Kill, and Mayerling, billed as being the movie where ‘no one woman could satisfy him... until he fell in love.” It starred Catherine Deneuve, James Mason, James Robertson-Justice, Genevieve Page and Ava Gardner as the Empress Elizabeth.

• In the Hants History column dating back to 1944,  the provincial Department of Mines announced oil drilling would be carried out in Windsor and the Town of Windsor council voted to buy a chlorinator for its water supply.

In wartime news from 1944, Pte. Percy Harvey, of Summerville, was killed in action; Pte. Gordon Frizzell, of Windsor, was seriously wounded in France; W02 (WAG) St. Clair Haley, of Windsor, went missing during bombing operations; Pte. Garet Leon Harvey, of North Noel Road, L/Sgt. B. Hennigar, of Noel, Gnr. O. Hennessey, of Windsor, and Pte. Edward Andrew Lake, of Five Mile Plains, were wounded overseas; and Pte. Murray G. Whitehead, of Wentworth Creek, was missing in action.

• In the Hants History column from 1919, Joseph McAulay drowned near the St. Croix River fertilizer pier.

In other news, the price of cultivated strawberries fluctuated so much that it was reported retailers were “doubtless glad” the season was over. In other agricultural news, new potatoes were selling for $2.40 to $3 per bushel.

In wartime news from 1944, 57 men and three nurses were honoured when they returned home to Shubenacadie. Each one was presented with a watch at a Peace Day ceremony.

In 1969, Jaycettes Freda Stephens and Frances Coombes presented Windsor’s mayor Eric Nott with a cheque for $300. The money was raised during the Apple Blossom Festival princess dance and they suggested the funds go towards buying tables for the community centre.
In 1969, Jaycettes Freda Stephens and Frances Coombes presented Windsor’s mayor Eric Nott with a cheque for $300. The money was raised during the Apple Blossom Festival princess dance and they suggested the funds go towards buying tables for the community centre.

Participants in the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews student exchange program visited Windsor in 1969, where Scott Sheffield — the inspector of schools — and his wife (who had no name listed) entertained the guests.
Participants in the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews student exchange program visited Windsor in 1969, where Scott Sheffield — the inspector of schools — and his wife (who had no name listed) entertained the guests.

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