Top News

Hants History: March 5-18, 2019 edition

Grade 12 student Shannon O’Keefe created a larger-than-life portrait of King Tut at Hants West Rural High School in 1994. It took her six weeks to create. Pictured admiring her work is teacher Martha Wheaton.
Grade 12 student Shannon O’Keefe created a larger-than-life portrait of King Tut at Hants West Rural High School in 1994. It took her six weeks to create. Pictured admiring her work is teacher Martha Wheaton. - SaltWire File Photo
WINDSOR, N.S. —

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

25 years ago (March 2 and 9, 1994 editions)

• RCMP officers seized about $1,000 of illegal tobacco, plus two video gambling machines from a residence in Three Mile Plains.

• The search of a private residence in Windsor resulted in a number of drug charges after RCMP seized about $700 worth of hash and marijuana.

Fred Demont, a Windsor-based woodworker, created a dozen replica hurley hockey sticks for the Windsor Hockey Heritage Society to use on Long Pond in 1994.
Fred Demont, a Windsor-based woodworker, created a dozen replica hurley hockey sticks for the Windsor Hockey Heritage Society to use on Long Pond in 1994.

• Sepracor Incorporated, of Marlborough, Massachusetts, bought the “long unproductive Pharmaglobe drug manufacturing plant” in West Hants for $3.6 million.

• Premier John Savage came to Windsor to discuss rebuilding the provincial economy while attending the annual meeting of the Hants West Liberal Association.

While in town, he announced that motorists may have to wait a long time to have the twinning of Highway 101 between Windsor and Sackville completed. He said when the Liberals came into office, they discovered the highway budget had been considerably overspent.

“It’s high on the list of priorities but I can’t give a date when it will be done,” he told the Journal.

West Hants stayed with Tory Ron Russell during the election, which the Journal noted left the area “with no clout in the provincial cabinet.”

• Leslie Hamilton received a plaque from the Nova Scotia Tourism Association, thanking him for his volunteer work at the Walton Lighthouse. Over the summer, he greeted many of the 1,500 tourists who visited the landmark and shared with them the area’s folklore.

• Fred Demont, a Windsor-based woodworker, created ‘hurleys’ for the Windsor Hockey Heritage Society. The hockey sticks were to be used by area children to simulate the first hockey game played at Long Pond. He agreed to make a dozen replica sticks, and a friend of his brought him several pieces of ash to carve.

Demont also donated a pair of brown skates, with single blades, that were once worn by his brother, Robert, before he left for the First World War. He was one of the many local men who never made it back.

• The annual Bowl for Millions benefit brought in $8,500 in West Hants and $7,100 in East Hants for Big Brothers/Big Sisters.

• Funding for the Mainstreet Program was cut by the provincial government, which had the Windsor Business Improvement Development Commission (BIDC) questioning its own future.

• Grade 12 student Shannon O’Keefe spent six weeks creating a larger-than-life portrait of King Tut at Hants West Rural High School.

• Circle, Mermaid Theatres’ youth group, was presenting an all ages coffee gig to help fundraise for them to attend the Nova Scotia Drama Festival.

Five bands were participating in the fundraiser: A Fish’s View, Windsor; Prozac, Windsor; Ian Janes Band, Windsor; Sawbelly, Greenwood; and Philler, Halifax.

Large ships, like the Gypsum King, had no trouble breaking through the ice of the Avon River near Hantsport. This picture was taken in 1994.
Large ships, like the Gypsum King, had no trouble breaking through the ice of the Avon River near Hantsport. This picture was taken in 1994.

 

To observe the 1994 Heritage Day, Eric Smith was one of several volunteers who attended an event at the Hantsport School to explain to students the importance of remembering history. In this photo, Smith was showing a photo of the Bluenose, which was built by MacKinley Shipyard in Mount Denson around 1904.
To observe the 1994 Heritage Day, Eric Smith was one of several volunteers who attended an event at the Hantsport School to explain to students the importance of remembering history. In this photo, Smith was showing a photo of the Bluenose, which was built by MacKinley Shipyard in Mount Denson around 1904.

 

50 years ago (Feb. 26 and March 5, 1969 editions)

• Mary Brown was crowned queen of the 1969 Windsor Regional High School winter carnival. Her attendants were Pat O’Brien, Shelley Crocker, Anne Porter, Lina Fraser, Beverly Smeltzer, and Winnie LaRusie.

Mary Brown was crowned queen of the 1969 Windsor Regional High School winter carnival.
Mary Brown was crowned queen of the 1969 Windsor Regional High School winter carnival.

• Kenneth Chisholm McNealy, of Hantsport, retired from Minas Basin Pulp and Power Company Limited after 40 years. It was reported that in 1969, he had been with the company longer than any other employee.

He began in the summer of 1928, working with the construction crew building the new pulp mill in Hantsport. He stayed on as a barkerman and worked on the first production shift in February 1929.

• A number of new nurses were capped at the conclusion of the Payzant Memorial Hospital’s School of Nursing. Those receiving caps were Linda Langdon, Hantsport; Mary Simpson, Clementsvale; Carol Campbell, Greenwood; Paulette Boutilier, Sydney Mines; Sharon DeWolfe, Lockhartville; Jean MacDonnell, Port Williams; and Alice Mao, Hong Kong.

• The newest member of the Annapolis Valley Radio (AVR) family signed on. The 1,000 watt AM station in Digby was named CKDY. It marked the fifth radio station within the AVR system, with other AM stations located in Windsor, Kentville, and Middleton and one FM station on the North Mountain.

• The Women’s Institute of Hants County sponsored a five-week interior decorating class in Windsor. Among the topics explored were upholstering and refinishing furniture.

• King’s-Edgehill alumni were mourning the death of a former headmaster. Rev. Gerald White died Feb. 24, 1969 in Wisconsin. A memorial service at the Windsor campus was planned.

White joined the staff of Kings Collegiate School as a chaplain and English teacher in 1933. He was appointed headmaster the following year and held that position for 10 years.

• The grand reopening of a ‘modernized Dominion’ store on Gerrish Street was taking place, with dozens of deals for customers. Among the deals were oven-ready Grade A chicken for 39 cents a pound, a 20-pound bag of Purity all-purpose flour for $1.85, a package of Jell-O for 10 cents, and five 19-ounce tins of Avon brand apple sauce for $1.

• Wilcox Brothers Limited was holding a special housewares sale. From oven mitts and dishcloths to a measuring spoon set made of copper and anodized aluminium and an egg timer, everything listed on a full-page advertisement was on sale for 88 cents.

• The Imperial Theatre never failed to offer movies for a wide variety of tastes. To kick off March, the movie theatre was showing Far From the Madding Crowd, starring Julie Christie, Terence Stamp, Peter Finch and Alan Bates; Thunderbirds Are Go; Journey to Shiloh featuring ‘the unstoppable seven;’ and the tune-in, turn-on comedy of the year, It Takes Two to Skidoo, starring Jackie Gleason and Carol Channing.

• In the Hants History column dating back to 1944, it was noted that the Windsor Oddfellows celebrated the 125th anniversary of the founding of Oddfellowship. In other anniversary news, the Windsor Rotary Club celebrated its 15th year of operation.

Plans were also underway to race horses on the ice at Lakelands.

In wartime news from 1944, Albert Warden, of Windsor, was reported to be a prisoner of war and two privates were reported as wounded: Earl Rogers, of Windsor, and Earle Edward Sanderson, of Scotch Village.

In the Hants History column from 1919, it was reported that the steamer Hilma was the first to arrive at port in Windsor that year. Captain McKinley was in command.

Leslie Hamilton received a plaque from the Nova Scotia Tourism Association, thanking him for his volunteer work at the Walton Lighthouse. Pictured presenting the plaque in 1994 were Ted Burgess, left, and Reg Clark, right.
Leslie Hamilton received a plaque from the Nova Scotia Tourism Association, thanking him for his volunteer work at the Walton Lighthouse. Pictured presenting the plaque in 1994 were Ted Burgess, left, and Reg Clark, right.

 

The annual Ski For Fun day was held in February 1994 and concluded another successful season at Ski Martock. Pictured are ski instructors Erica Jones (cowgirl), Thom Oulton (cow), Rhonda Lewis (baby) and Mike McLearn (clown and hot dog chef).
The annual Ski For Fun day was held in February 1994 and concluded another successful season at Ski Martock. Pictured are ski instructors Erica Jones (cowgirl), Thom Oulton (cow), Rhonda Lewis (baby) and Mike McLearn (clown and hot dog chef).

 

Recent Stories