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Small but mighty: Upper Vaughan Hospital Auxiliary donates $5,300 worth of hospital equipment

Frances Allen helps test out the mobile vital signs monitor and stand that the Upper Vaughan Hospital Auxiliary purchased for Unit 500 at the Hants Community Hospital. Pictured showing Allen and her fellow auxiliary members how the monitor works is clinical leader Michelle Maynard.
Frances Allen helps test out the mobile vital signs monitor and stand that the Upper Vaughan Hospital Auxiliary purchased for Unit 500 at the Hants Community Hospital. Pictured showing Allen and her fellow auxiliary members how the monitor works is clinical leader Michelle Maynard. - Carole Morris-Underhill
WINDSOR, N.S. —

It’s amazing what a small but dedicated group of women can accomplish in just a few years.

The seven members of the Upper Vaughan Hospital Auxiliary recently presented a cheque for $4,000 to help purchase a mobile vital signs monitor and stand for Unit 500 at the Hants Community Hospital.

They also donated $1,300 for an over-the-bed table PAC for the operating room.

This isn’t their first donation — in fact, the auxiliary has supplied about $30,000 worth of hospital equipment since 1976.

“We are very lucky to have the hospital here,” said Mackie Chandler, the auxiliary president, when asked why they fundraise to buy equipment.

“We’re a small group but it’s very important and we enjoy doing it.”

The seven-member group meets monthly, each paying $5.

Their biggest fundraiser is the annual hospital bazaar in the fall. Leading up to it, they sell tickets on a raffle basket.

It takes the auxiliary between four to five years to raise about $5,000.

The last donation of equipment was in July 2015.

Health services manager Pam Woodman said the mobile vital signs monitor and stand, which can measure blood pressure, O2 stats and temperature, is a welcome addition to the unit.

“It’s a vital machine that makes it more efficient for nurses to collect (data) and look after our patients here,” said Woodman.

“We probably use it two to three times every day. It has to be used every shift for every patient,” she said, adding that Unit 500 cares for, on average, 14 patients daily.

Woodman said the machine, which is on wheels, allows for efficient and consistent data collection from patient to patient and nurse to nurse.

“I’d like to thank the auxiliary so much for their donation. They’ve helped us over the years with many things and they’re a lovely group of people,” said Woodman.

Chandler said they’re always looking for more people to join the auxiliary as they help raise funds for the hospital. The best way to contact the group is individually via Facebook or when they’re out in the community.

Members of the Upper Vaughan Hospital Auxiliary gather around the new vital signs monitor and stand that they recently donated to Unit 500 at the Hants Community Hospital. Pictured here are, from left, clinical leader Michelle Maynard, JoAnne Smith, Betty Chandler, Elsie Herridge, Frances Allen (seated), Georgie Rafuse, health services manager Pam Woodman, and Mackie Chandler. Missing from photo is Bernice Levy. - Carole Morris-Underhill
Members of the Upper Vaughan Hospital Auxiliary gather around the new vital signs monitor and stand that they recently donated to Unit 500 at the Hants Community Hospital. Pictured here are, from left, clinical leader Michelle Maynard, JoAnne Smith, Betty Chandler, Elsie Herridge, Frances Allen (seated), Georgie Rafuse, health services manager Pam Woodman, and Mackie Chandler. Missing from photo is Bernice Levy. - Carole Morris-Underhill

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