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HANTS HISTORY: Dec. 5, 2016 edition

Residents were ready to model the latest fashions in November 1981 to help raise funds to send Jeffrey Thompson, a young boy with a rare skin disorder, to Germany for treatment. Pictured are, from left, Sharon Kubryn, Helen Lindsay, Yvonne Forrest, and Ruth Gass.
Residents were ready to model the latest fashions in November 1981 to help raise funds to send Jeffrey Thompson, a young boy with a rare skin disorder, to Germany for treatment. Pictured are, from left, Sharon Kubryn, Helen Lindsay, Yvonne Forrest, and Ruth Gass.

Here's a look at what was making the news 35 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

35 years ago (Nov. 18 and Nov. 25, 1981 editions)

• The fundraising campaign for nine-year-old Jeffrey Thompson far exceeded what his parents, Robert and Gail Thompson, ever imagined.

Close to $60,000 had been raised to send the young boy to Germany to receive a special treatment for a rare skin condition. He was scheduled to fly to Toronto in December to meet with Dr. Paul Kozack before heading to his clinic in 1982.

• The Journal reported that a technical report by the Department of Environment threw “a shadow of doubt over the wisdom of West Hants Municipal Council's decision” to allow a controversial incinerator at the proposed Irishman's Road site. What was being proposed was a prototype – something that the department had reservations over.

• West Hants council set aside $11,000 to help build a road that would connect the Brooklyn Fire Department with an improved water supply.

• It was noted that “for the first time since anybody present could remember, Warden Stanton Sanford was absent” from a West Hants council meeting due to illness. Taking the chair for the meeting was Deputy Warden Bruce Saunders.

35 years ago (Nov. 18 and Nov. 25, 1981 editions)

• The fundraising campaign for nine-year-old Jeffrey Thompson far exceeded what his parents, Robert and Gail Thompson, ever imagined.

Close to $60,000 had been raised to send the young boy to Germany to receive a special treatment for a rare skin condition. He was scheduled to fly to Toronto in December to meet with Dr. Paul Kozack before heading to his clinic in 1982.

• The Journal reported that a technical report by the Department of Environment threw “a shadow of doubt over the wisdom of West Hants Municipal Council's decision” to allow a controversial incinerator at the proposed Irishman's Road site. What was being proposed was a prototype – something that the department had reservations over.

• West Hants council set aside $11,000 to help build a road that would connect the Brooklyn Fire Department with an improved water supply.

• It was noted that “for the first time since anybody present could remember, Warden Stanton Sanford was absent” from a West Hants council meeting due to illness. Taking the chair for the meeting was Deputy Warden Bruce Saunders.

Long-time Windsor Fire Department fire chief, Walter Stephens, received a gold firefighters' pick-axe in 1981 in honour of his contributions to the West Hants Division of the Western Nova Scotia Firefighters Association. Pictured presenting the ax is Lawrence Nunn, the division president.

• It was noted that “for the first time since anybody present could remember, Warden Stanton Sanford was absent” from a West Hants council meeting due to illness. Taking the chair for the meeting was Deputy Warden Bruce Saunders.

• Long-time Windsor Fire Department fire chief, Walter Stephens, received a gold firefighters' pick-axe as he was commended for his contributions to the West Hants Division of the Western Nova Scotia Firefighters Association.

• Brooklyn firefighters battled a blaze at an upholstery business in Brooklyn Nov. 9. Fire gutted the business, resulting in an estimated $15,000 in damages.

• Winners of the Opening Mixed Bonspiel at the Windsor Curling Club were Bill Mulhall (skip), Heather Abell (lead), Audrey Woodman (mate) and Dave Carmichael (second).

The Canadian Keyes Fibre Tug of War team, from Hantsport, weighed in at 1,688 pounds prior to the lightweight championship contest at the Atlantic Winter Fair in 1966. They lost the final to Falmouth.
At the Nov. 11, 1981 Remembrance Day ceremony, three generations of the Palmer family gathered to remember the war dead. Pictured here are, from left, Dianne Palmer, in the Naval Reserves, her grandfather Clifford Palmer, who, at the end of the Second World War served with his son, Clifford Jr., on the ship Port Arthur.

50 years ago (Nov. 16 and Nov. 23, 1966 editions)

•St. Paul's United Church Christian Education Centre, in Mount Uniacke, officially opened its doors Nov. 27.

• Dr. J. Donald Carson was the latest physician to arrive in Windsor at the new office in the civic building. The Saint John, New Brunswick, native was said to specialize in obstetrics and pediatrics.

• On the front page of the paper there was a note about a Massachusetts hunter stopping his vehicle on Gerrish Street. The vehicle drew a crowd as on its roof was a bear, who had lost its front right paw presumably in a trap, and a deer that “were of a size of which a hunter could be proud.” The name of the hunter was not provided.

• The inaugural Michael Harvie trophy was presented at the Windsor Golf Club's closing dinner in memory of the Grade 10 student who died earlier in the year. Described as an enthusiastic golfer, he was an assistant pro at the club.

• An article on the rise of scurvy in infants appeared in the paper, with parents receiving tips on how to prevent or cure it.

• The Canadian Keyes Fibre Tug of War team, from Hantsport, weighed in at 1,688 pounds prior to the lightweight championship contest at the Atlantic Winter Fair. They lost the final to a team from Falmouth. The Hantsport team consisted of Alton Davidson, Bud Allen, Ralph Keddy, Paul Allen, Doug Walker, Reg Walsh, Danny Miner, Alton Allen, Eddie Pearson, Malcolm Coffill and Jim Smith as a spare.

The Falmouth team, which weighed in at 1,700 pounds, consisted of Charles Rafuse, Brian Macumber, DeWight Ross, Blake Sanford, Donald Macumber, Walter Mosher, Gordon MacDonald, Carleton Swinamer, Michael Oulton, Jim MacDonald and Mac Brown as a spare.

• Four people were vying for three available seats on Windsor council. They were incumbent councillors Walter Stephens and Eric Nott, and newcomers Les Beazley and Alvin Cochrane.

• The community was in mourning after learning that E. Gordon Fiske, of Marblehead, Massachusetts, and formerly of Selma, and his only son, Ensign James Fiske, who was spending his leave from the U.S. Navy with his parents prior to heading to Vietnam, died in a boating accident in Massachusetts.

• The Hants History column describing the highlights from 1941 and 1916 contained a number of interesting tidbits.

In 1941, Windsor's population was 3,402, while was Hants County's 21,756. In November of that year, James Sherwood, of Bishopville, collected a $3 bounty after shooting a 17-pound wildcat in Murray’s Woods. It was also reported that Lew Hogan, of Chester Road, trapped or shot 19 bears.

In 1916, Sergeant Ralph Spence, of St. Croix and staff member at the Royal Bank of Canada in Windsor, died from his wounds while serving in the First World War.

The new schooner Minnie G. Parsons was launched at Cheverie on Nov. 28, 1916.

In more hunting news, Harry Sanford, of Upper Burlington, shot a full grown wildcat in 1916 that had been raiding his chicken coop.

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