Top News

Stork makes surprise delivery at Hants Community Hospital


WINDSOR — Bryce Adam Upshaw will have a very special tale to tell when he gets older.

The newborn is among just a handful of babies delivered at the Hants Community Hospital each year. And, his arrival into this world in the wee morning hours of Sept. 22 was also quite unexpected.

“Because of her last period and the way she was measuring, (we thought) she was only between 33 and 36 weeks,” said Serina Campbell, Bryce’s grandmother.

Campbell said her daughter, Lacey Snow, began complaining about pains around 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21 — the night of the big rainstorm.

“We thought she was really early so we didn't think she was in labour,” recalled Campbell, who spoke to Snow several times that night by phone.

After taking a bath to see if the pains would cease, Snow called her mom again, and stressed she thought they were labour pains.

“I knew as soon as I started to get the pains that it was labour. She kept telling me that ‘no, it can't be, it can't be.’ But I knew it was,” said Snow.

Around 12:30 a.m., Campbell made her way to Snow’s Panuke Road home. Due to the poor driving conditions, she opted to go to the Hants Community Hospital rather than chance it and drive to Halifax.

“By the time they got her assessed and everything, it was 2:30 a.m. and she was already almost five centimetres (dilated). They said 'you're not making it to the Halifax hospital,’” recalled Campbell.

“So by this time we were in panic mode because we didn't know how far along the baby was.”

Another concern for the family: the air ambulance also couldn’t make it to the hospital safely due to the weather, Campbell said. However, a crew from Halifax braved the roads and arrived in time for the delivery.

Both Campbell and Snow praised the staff at the Windsor-based hospital for their compassion and help during the unexpected delivery.

“The nurses were awesome. They kept reassuring her and telling her, ‘you're doing great, everything is fine,’” said Campbell.

Two of the nurses on duty at the Windsor hospital that night were Melissa Parker and Kristi Arseneau Haliburton. The family can't thank them enough.

“Between them and my mom, they did a pretty good job of keeping me calmed down because I was freaking out quite a bit,” said Snow.

The Hants Community Hospital lost its special ward for child delivery about two decades ago. Major cutbacks to obstetrical services began in the mid-90s, and eventually resulted in the phasing out of the service.

John Gillis, a Capital Health spokesperson, said on average two or three babies are born at the Windsor hospital each year. Women typically travel to Kentville or Halifax to give birth.

“They said if I had've tried to take her to the hospital myself, I would've been delivering the baby on the side of the road,” Campbell said.

Snow gave birth at 4:30 a.m. Sept. 22 to a healthy baby boy. He weighed in at seven pounds and six ounces.

Much to her relief, Snow said hospital staff determined that her fifth child was not premature.

“They said he was 36 weeks to full term,” said Snow.

Bryce is Snow's fifth child. His siblings are: seven-year-old Brooklynn Snow, six-year-old Jayden Snow, nearly three-year-old Kylee Upshaw, one-year-old Chace Upshaw.

 

 

The newborn is among just a handful of babies delivered at the Hants Community Hospital each year. And, his arrival into this world in the wee morning hours of Sept. 22 was also quite unexpected.

“Because of her last period and the way she was measuring, (we thought) she was only between 33 and 36 weeks,” said Serina Campbell, Bryce’s grandmother.

Campbell said her daughter, Lacey Snow, began complaining about pains around 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21 — the night of the big rainstorm.

“We thought she was really early so we didn't think she was in labour,” recalled Campbell, who spoke to Snow several times that night by phone.

After taking a bath to see if the pains would cease, Snow called her mom again, and stressed she thought they were labour pains.

“I knew as soon as I started to get the pains that it was labour. She kept telling me that ‘no, it can't be, it can't be.’ But I knew it was,” said Snow.

Around 12:30 a.m., Campbell made her way to Snow’s Panuke Road home. Due to the poor driving conditions, she opted to go to the Hants Community Hospital rather than chance it and drive to Halifax.

“By the time they got her assessed and everything, it was 2:30 a.m. and she was already almost five centimetres (dilated). They said 'you're not making it to the Halifax hospital,’” recalled Campbell.

“So by this time we were in panic mode because we didn't know how far along the baby was.”

Another concern for the family: the air ambulance also couldn’t make it to the hospital safely due to the weather, Campbell said. However, a crew from Halifax braved the roads and arrived in time for the delivery.

Both Campbell and Snow praised the staff at the Windsor-based hospital for their compassion and help during the unexpected delivery.

“The nurses were awesome. They kept reassuring her and telling her, ‘you're doing great, everything is fine,’” said Campbell.

Two of the nurses on duty at the Windsor hospital that night were Melissa Parker and Kristi Arseneau Haliburton. The family can't thank them enough.

“Between them and my mom, they did a pretty good job of keeping me calmed down because I was freaking out quite a bit,” said Snow.

The Hants Community Hospital lost its special ward for child delivery about two decades ago. Major cutbacks to obstetrical services began in the mid-90s, and eventually resulted in the phasing out of the service.

John Gillis, a Capital Health spokesperson, said on average two or three babies are born at the Windsor hospital each year. Women typically travel to Kentville or Halifax to give birth.

“They said if I had've tried to take her to the hospital myself, I would've been delivering the baby on the side of the road,” Campbell said.

Snow gave birth at 4:30 a.m. Sept. 22 to a healthy baby boy. He weighed in at seven pounds and six ounces.

Much to her relief, Snow said hospital staff determined that her fifth child was not premature.

“They said he was 36 weeks to full term,” said Snow.

Bryce is Snow's fifth child. His siblings are: seven-year-old Brooklynn Snow, six-year-old Jayden Snow, nearly three-year-old Kylee Upshaw, one-year-old Chace Upshaw.

 

 

Recent Stories